Puente Democrático
 
Publications
 
January 10, 2018
Mogherini, the European Union, and Cuba
(The Global Americans)
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
August 23, 2017
An Act of Remembrance and Solidarity
From this year forward, the Argentine capital will be a pioneer city in Latin America as it commemorates the victims of totalitarianism every 23rd of August. Someone who will always be in our thoughts on this day will be Cecilia de la Torre, who passed last December.
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
Year XV N° 64 - April 26, 2017
Two reform proposals for membership in the UN human rights council
The biggest problem the UN is facing when defending Human Rights is that only a minority of its 193 members have a well-institutionalized democracy. Furthermore, unlike many authoritarian regimes and countries with poor democratic systems, which constitute the majority in the General Assembly, they do not coordinate their policy on human rights with each other.
Gabriel C. Salvia y Matthias Peschke
888
April 10, 2017
Cubans’ motorcycle diary woes
(Latin America Goes Global) Unlike their Latin American counterparts, Cubans face unique challenges traveling and emigrating within Latin America. And that doesn’t include the trouble leaving the island.
Sybil Rhodes
888
February 23, 2017
It’s time to set limits to Cuban Dictatorship
(Latin America Goes Global) The Cuban government is practicing abroad what it is strictly forbidden within its own borders, infringing the political reciprocity principle in bilateral relations.
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
February 21, 2017
Rational Migration Policy in a Xenophobic World
(Latin America Goes Global) If Argentina were to help foment a global trend in xenophobia it would be worrisome, and surprising. The country has one of the most open migration regimes in the world.
Sybil Rhodes
888
January 17, 2017
Is the U.S. opening to Cuba dead in the water?
Christopher Sabatini
888
December 14, 2016
The European Union, Cuba and Human Rights
Without a Cuban gesture towards a more open political system, it does not make sense to discuss an agreement since the one party regime of Raúl Castro would not approve any improvement in the area of human rights. Thus, the negotiations between the EU and Cuba started rather poorly if we believe there was ever any genuine interest by the EU in achieving any progress regarding a more open political system in the island.
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
December 13, 2016
A Too Big Reward for China
The perception that China rewards loyalty is wrong. Not only is it doubtful that kowtowing to China will bring short-term benefits but, on the contrary, it is rather quite possible that we’ll end up paying a high price for such policy in the future. If today’s decisions are shaping our future, then granting China with market economy status will surely be a nail in the coffin for Argentina.
Juan Pablo Cardenal
888
November 30, 2016
Fidel Castro and the Integrity of Estela de Carlotto in the Defence of Human Rights
(Infobae) A human rights figure cannot be indifferent towards human rights violations that take place in the remaining dictatorships nor they can ignore such evident facts to defend the indefensible.
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
November 29, 2016
Human Rights Defended by Dictatorships?
(Latin America Goes Global) Recently, a third of the members of the UN Human Rights Council were renewed with China, the biggest dictatorship in the world, accumulating no less than 180 votes which gives proof to the assumption that several developed democracies voted in China's favour.
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
Year XIV N° 59 - November 9, 2016
Human Rights before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall
The historical framework. Human rights in a communist dictatorship. The Peaceful Revolution in Autumn 1989 and German Unity on 3 October 19904. The complexity of the world in 2016. The role of human rights today. Basic principles of human rights policy in Europe.
Günter Nooke
888
Year XIV N° 58 - September 15th, 2016
Dealing with the authoritarian resurgence
A renewed struggle between democracy and authoritarianism has emerged. The decade-long democratic decline reported by Freedom House has been most dramatic within the ranks of already authoritarian regimes, which have become even more repressive. At the same time, the most influential among them—China, Russia, and Iran—have become more internationalist. In doing so, they have found ways to exploit integration and to broaden their influence in the democratic world. Through the development of the antidemocratic toolkit of simulated NGOs, think tanks, election monitors, and news media, the autocrats are actively seeking to undermine democracy from within.
Christopher Walker
888
August 5, 2016
Cuba, the remnant dictatorship in Latin America
However, despite the objective fact that Cuba is not a democracy because it established a one-party system and therefore its authorities do not win free and fair elections with competition there is so much evidence of the repressive features of their regime that is documented in its own Constitution, Criminal Law, Special laws and decisions of the People's Courts - all denounced by the most prestigious international human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch - therefore drawing attention that in Latin America the government of the Castro brothers is not seen for what it evidently is: a dictatorship.
Gabriel C. Salvia
888
Year XIV N° 57 - June 9, 2016
The more things change in Cuba’s external relations, the more they remain the same in its domestic politics
As Cuba’s foreign relations undergo epoch-making change, and following President Barack Obama’s historic visit to the island in March, Havana circles the wagons of state doubling down on political centralization under Raúl Castro and los históricos.
Armando Chaguaceda y Ted A. Henken
888
 
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